A misanthropic humanist.
An anxiety-prone intellectual with an overly analytical bent.
A lover of spirits and a misfit of epic proportions.
Welcome. Now go away.

 

Potential has a shelf life.

― Margaret Atwood (via psych-quotes)

Goddamit! Now you tell me.

Trauma permanently changes us.

This is the big, scary truth about trauma: there is no such thing as ‘getting over it.’ The five stages of grief model marks universal stages in learning to accept loss, but the reality is in fact much bigger: a major life disruption leaves a new normal in its wake. There is no ‘back to the old me.’ You are different now, full stop.

This is not a wholly negative thing. Healing from trauma can also mean finding new strength and joy. The goal of healing is not a papering-over of changes in an effort to preserve or present things as normal. It is to acknowledge and wear your new life — warts, wisdom, and all — with courage.

Catherine Woodiwiss, “A New Normal: Ten Things I’ve Learned About Trauma” (via makojaeger)

(Source: twloha)

gaytectives:

you are a human being 

you are a human being

humans get hungry

humans get tired

humans forget

humans have emotions

you are a human being and losing control is normal

just make sure that you don’t let that loss of control define you

because humans are strong

humans recover

humans are built to survive

you are a human being

and you will make it through

(Source: gaytectivesinactive)

When people with privilege hear that they have privilege, what they hear is not, ‘Our society is structured so that your life is more valued than others.’ They hear, ‘Everything, no matter what, will be handed to you. You have done nothing to achieve what you have.’ That’s not strictly true, and hardly anyone who points out another’s privilege is making that accusation. There are privileged people who work very hard. The privilege they experience is the absence of barriers that exist for other people.

…If a discussion about privilege serves any purpose, it is so that the privileged recognize their own and are then compelled to work to dismantle the structures that have bestowed privilege upon them. In order to do so, one would have to recognize the call to ‘check your privilege’ as less of a personal attack, because it is not. It’s a wake-up call to action.